RAM

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== '''RESTORING ACTIVE MEMORY (RAM)''' ==
 
== '''RESTORING ACTIVE MEMORY (RAM)''' ==
  
from the [http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/BTO/Programs/Restoring_Active_Memory_RAM.aspx DARPA RAM website]
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The goal of RAM is to develop a fully implantable device that can electrically stimulate the brain to improve memory function. The program’s immediate focus is to deliver new treatments for those who have experienced a traumatic brain injury, such as veterans returning from combat. In the long term, such therapies could help patients with a broad range of ailments, from Alzheimer’s to dementia.  RAM is part of a broader portfolio of programs within DARPA that support President Obama’s [http://www.whitehouse.gov/share/brain-initiative BRAIN initiative].
  
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As part of the RAM project, the [http://www.upenn.edu/ University of Pennsylvania] (including the [[Main_Page|Computational Memory Lab]], the [http://www.sas.upenn.edu School of Arts and Sciences] and the [http://www.med.upenn.edu/ Perelman School of Medicine]) is partnering with the following hospitals, institutes and universities:
  
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious cause of disability in the United States. Diagnosed in more than 270,000 military servicemembers since 2000 and affecting an estimated 1.7 million U.S. civilians each year, TBI frequently results in an impaired ability to retrieve memories formed prior to injury and a reduced capacity to form or retain new memories following injury. Despite the scale of the problem, no effective therapies currently exist to mitigate the long-term consequences of TBI on memory. Through the Restoring Active Memory (RAM) program, DARPA seeks to accelerate the development of technology able to address this public health challenge and help servicemembers and others overcome memory deficits by developing new neuroprosthetics to bridge gaps in the injured brain.
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*[http://www.columbia.edu/ Columbia University]
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*[http://dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth College]
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*[http://www.emory.edu/home/index.html Emory University]
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*[http://www.jefferson.edu/ Thomas Jefferson University]
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*[http://www.mayoclinic.org/ Mayo Clinic]
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*[http://www.nih.gov/ National Institutes of Health]
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*[http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/ University of Texas Southwestern]
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*[http://www.medtronic.com/ Medtronic, Inc.]
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*[https://www.llnl.gov/ Lawrence Livermore National Labs]
  
The end goal of RAM is to develop and test a wireless, fully implantable neural-interface medical device for human clinical use, but a number of significant advances will be targeted on the way to achieving that goal. To start, DARPA will support the development of multi-scale computational models with high spatial and temporal resolution that describe how neurons code declarative memories—those well-defined parcels of knowledge that can be consciously recalled and described in words, such as events, times, and places. Researchers will also explore new methods for analysis and decoding of neural signals to understand how targeted stimulation might be applied to help the brain reestablish an ability to encode new memories following brain injury. “Encoding” refers to the process by which newly learned information is attended to and processed by the brain when first encountered.
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For more information, please visit the [http://www.darpa.mil/program/restoring-active-memory DARPA RAM website].
  
Building on this foundational work, researchers will attempt to integrate the computational models developed under RAM into new, implantable, closed-loop systems able to deliver targeted neural stimulation that may ultimately help restore memory function. These studies will involve volunteers living with deficits in the encoding and/or retrieval of declarative memories and/or volunteers undergoing neurosurgery for other neurological conditions.
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== '''RAM Public Data Release''' ==
  
In addition to human clinical efforts, RAM will support animal studies to advance the state-of-the-art of quantitative models that account for the encoding and retrieval of complex memories and memory attributes, including their hierarchical associations with one another. This work will also seek to identify any characteristic neural and behavioral correlates of memories facilitated by therapeutic devices.
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Data from 251 subjects collected during Phase I and Phase II of the RAM project are available for download. The following data are included:
  
RAM and related DARPA neuroscience efforts are informed by members of an independent Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) panel. Communications with ELSI panelists supplement the oversight provided by institutional review boards that govern human clinical studies and animal use.
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* Electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings
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* Demographic information (age, gender, race/ethnicity, handedness)
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* Individual electrode contact atlas location and coordinates for localization
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* Freesurfer files: cortical surface rendering
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* Seizure onset zone, interictal spiking, and bad lead information
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* Experiment design documents
  
RAM is part of a broader portfolio of programs within DARPA that support President Obama’s [http://www.whitehouse.gov/share/brain-initiative BRAIN initiative].
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* Session notes, behavioral event data, and iEEG recording data (split by channel) for the following RAM experiments:
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** FR1/2: Verbal Free Recall
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** CatFR1/2: Categorized Verbal Free Recall
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** PAL1/2: Verbal Paired Associates Learning
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** YC1/2: Yellow Cab Spatial Navigation
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** TH1: Treasure Hunt Spatial Navigation
  
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NOTE: Informed consent has been obtained from each subject to share their data, and personally identifiable information has been removed to protect subject confidentiality.
  
As part of the RAM project, the [http://www.upenn.edu/ University of Pennsylvania] (including the [[Main_Page|Computational Memory Lab]] (part of the [http://www.sas.upenn.edu School of Arts and Sciences] and the [http://www.med.upenn.edu/ Perelman School of Medicine]) are partnering with the following hospitals, institutes and universities:
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'''[http://memory.psych.upenn.edu/Request_RAM_Public_Data_access Request RAM data access]'''
 
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*[http://dartmouth.edu/ Dartmouth College]
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*[http://www.emory.edu/home/index.html Emory University]
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*[http://www.jefferson.edu/#health Thomas Jefferson University]
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*[http://www.mayoclinic.org/ Mayo Clinic]
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*[http://www.nih.gov/ National Institutes of Health]
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*[http://www.washington.edu/ University of Washington]
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For more information, please visit the [http://www.darpa.mil/Our_Work/BTO/Programs/Restoring_Active_Memory_RAM.aspx DARPA website].
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See our press release for Phase I [https://news.upenn.edu/news/penns-restoring-active-memory-project-releases-extensive-human-brain-dataset here] for additional information.

Latest revision as of 08:38, 16 October 2017

[edit] RESTORING ACTIVE MEMORY (RAM)

The goal of RAM is to develop a fully implantable device that can electrically stimulate the brain to improve memory function. The program’s immediate focus is to deliver new treatments for those who have experienced a traumatic brain injury, such as veterans returning from combat. In the long term, such therapies could help patients with a broad range of ailments, from Alzheimer’s to dementia. RAM is part of a broader portfolio of programs within DARPA that support President Obama’s BRAIN initiative.

As part of the RAM project, the University of Pennsylvania (including the Computational Memory Lab, the School of Arts and Sciences and the Perelman School of Medicine) is partnering with the following hospitals, institutes and universities:

For more information, please visit the DARPA RAM website.

[edit] RAM Public Data Release

Data from 251 subjects collected during Phase I and Phase II of the RAM project are available for download. The following data are included:

  • Electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings
  • Demographic information (age, gender, race/ethnicity, handedness)
  • Individual electrode contact atlas location and coordinates for localization
  • Freesurfer files: cortical surface rendering
  • Seizure onset zone, interictal spiking, and bad lead information
  • Experiment design documents
  • Session notes, behavioral event data, and iEEG recording data (split by channel) for the following RAM experiments:
    • FR1/2: Verbal Free Recall
    • CatFR1/2: Categorized Verbal Free Recall
    • PAL1/2: Verbal Paired Associates Learning
    • YC1/2: Yellow Cab Spatial Navigation
    • TH1: Treasure Hunt Spatial Navigation

NOTE: Informed consent has been obtained from each subject to share their data, and personally identifiable information has been removed to protect subject confidentiality.

Request RAM data access

See our press release for Phase I here for additional information.

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